Monday, May 5, 2015

The Serengeti Campaign highlighted on Love Animals website has come to an end and I want to thank everyone who contributed.  The Africa Network for Animal Welfare — USA and its companion organization in Nairobi continue to monitor the court decision.   Over $1,000 was raised and added to the large share already contributed by Serengeti Watch.  While we did not reach our goal, each and every donation is recognized as a powerful statement against the destruction of unique African habitat.

Monitoring the court decision, at this stage, means waiting for the court to announce its decision on the appeal brought by the Tanzanian Government that would overturn the earlier decision preventing the construction of a road across the World Heritage Site that is the Maasai Mara and the Serengeti, a vast region within the countries of Kenya and Tanzania.

I will post news that is forth coming.

Serengeti Road Construction ordered unlawful

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D.Gies 2009

June 20, 2014, the long-awaited decision by the East African Court of Justice, on the status of building a 53 km road across the Serengeti is finally in.  Judgement-Ref.-No.9-of-2010-Final

The East African Court rules the roadway built to bitumen standard (asphalt on top gravel and sand) across the Serengeti National Park is unlawful and infringes on the Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community, Articles 1 and 3.

The Africa Network for Animal Welfare (ANAW), with funding from Serengeti Watch and others, successfully argued that building the road would do irreversible harm to this “World Heritage Property” of  “outstanding Universal value” as described by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

This is a big win for environmentalist and the conservation movement in Africa.  The court was careful to balance the decision by adding that it did not want to block the development programs of Partner States to its jurisdictional powers.  Economic development will move forward and it is encouraged in all of East Africa.  This question was one of protecting the environment, the animals, and migration patterns of the hartebeest, wildebeest, zebra and the like, from irreversible harm in the face of human expansion.  Balancing commerce with conservation will always be a difficult battle.

This is a defining moment for saving an important part of the ecosystem in East Africa. Congratulations to ANAW, Serengeti Watch, and all those concerned for keeping a few places in the world majestic and untouched.