ANAW Contributes Perspective and Insight into Animal Welfare in East Africa

Earlier today I thought I had posted a link to the Africa Network for Animal Welfare’s  (ANAW’s) second edition of their signature publication Animal Welfare.  It is a great example of grassroots action to save African habitat and animals.

For anyone following my blog, the actual link is highlighted above.  (Sorry to have omitted it and thanks to a reader for bringing it to my attention.)

If you are interested in what volunteers and staff are doing in connection with ANAW in Nairobi, please take a look at the magazine. One story highlights Dr. Lisa McCarthy, a Fort Collins, Colorado veterinarian,  who mobilizes veterinarians for travel to Africa vaccinating animals and spay and neutering dogs and cats.

giraffe cover 170713
Continue reading “ANAW Contributes Perspective and Insight into Animal Welfare in East Africa”

Conservationists Throttled by Kenya Wildlife Service

The National Environmental Tribunal in Kenya has issued an order blocking the construction of the railroad across Nairobi National Park.  Regrettably, the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) and the government do not recognize the Tribunal, also known as the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) as an authority for overseeing Kenya’s natural resources.  Steve Itela of the Africa Network for Animal Welfare (ANAW) and other conservation groups are throttled by the Kenya Wildlife Service whose agents are guarding the construction site and allowing the railroad work to proceed.  This is reported by the Star News in Nairobi.

Advocates, friends of Africa, conservationists, world travelers, and others seeking to save Nairobi National Park and its wildlife can speak out by writing the Kenya Tourist Authority raising the concern about the damage taking place to one of the jewels of East Africa.  Indeed, it is reported by The Business Daily that a key rhinovirus sanctuary is Kenya’s habitat within the secure boundaries of Nairobi National Park.  Damaging the integrity of the park’s land mass harms the rhino population, all the park’s wildlife and the recovery of Kenya’s tourism.  The influence of tourist dollars may be the only lever left in this fight for the park. 

Jot a quick email to the Tourist Authority linked in the previous paragraph.  Support ANAW.  Make a little noise.  Thank you for taking the time to read this note.

Kenya’s Nairobi National Park Under Siege

Animal welfare advocate/conservationist are gaining on a few fronts so it seems. In the U.S., Ringling Brothers Circus is closing due to poor ticket sales.  Young audiences prefer to have elephants, lions and the like left in natural habitat.  It’s good.  At some point in their lives, they will travel to Africa, stimulate the economy, and see animals in natural settings appropriate to the space needed to live well.

The jury is still out on Sea World, under similar pressure with shaky ticket sales revenue.  One of my financial advisory letters observed that now might be the time to invest in Sea World’s stock speculating on a dramatic comeback.  I’m not going to include it in my portfolio.  It’s too risky for my interests, and I don’t agree with the ethics/business model. Just my opinion.

In Kenya, like-minded people are arguing against government plans to build

p1160884
Red Line is proposed railway bisecting Nairobi National Park

the proposed elevated railway through Nairobi National Park.  I have been to the wildlife refuge several times when I was living in Nairobi. It is a remarkable place set aside and encouraged by Jomo Kenyatta, the first President of Kenya in the early 1960’s.  It is literally adjacent to Langata Road on the eastern side of the city.  It is remarkable to enter the park that is so close to the city and see rhinoceros, lions, ostrich, and a diverse abundance of Africa’s wildlife.  No elephants to speak of, but so much of everything else.  The presence of construction, bulldozers, trucks, noise and the lasting result of building a massive railway through the park will be devastating.

In Nairobi, advocates are speaking out.  They are taking the position that legendary Richard Leakey, the head of the park’s administration should step down because he is not protecting the public resource. Richard Leakey, now in his 80’s, is the son of the famous Louis Leakey.  In the past, Richard Leakey championed the establishment of Kenya Wildlife Service.  He has a reputation for effectively fighting corruption for decades.  Now he is being accused of supporting questionable government moves to grab park land so close to the city for alternative development and private enterprise.

Hurray for mediating structures and the efforts of brave souls in East Africa willing to speak out against officials that break promises and do not follow due process. My view is to support these people fighting to conserve the animals and the land necessary for their existence. Indeed, the land is necessary for the people as well as the animals. We need to support these organizations in the non-governmental sector.   Like my friends in Africa say, “We are better together”.

An Open Letter to Friends of ANAW

The year 2016 has been a year of celebrations, successes, and milestones.  If you are receiving the ANAW holiday direct mail piece you will be reading about my meeting Jos Ngonyo in 2005 and the friendship between our families that continues to grow.  Indeed, the network of friends is a concentric ripple that extends far beyond just our families and friends, to also include what we now have started  in the name of conservation and animal welfare.

The organization we create is a reciprocal door into the countries we represent, the U.S. to Kenya and Kenya to the U.S.  From the perspective of the University of Denver, this is a gateway opportunity for students of the Graduate School of Social Work to meet Kenyans in their homes and in their lives.  This year, for the three groups of visiting private practice veterinarians, it is service to the communities of pet and livestock owners. For Kenyans, it is an introduction to people in North America, an exchange of ideas, aspirations, and future possibilities. ANAW is our mutual gateway.

For the animals in Kenya, it is advocacy and people communicating and doing for those that cannot speak for themselves.  ANAW stopped the road construction across the Serengeti with significant help from Serengeti Watch, brings attention to the encroachment of another roadway, a railroad, across Nairobi National Park, expands Animal Welfare Clubs into the curriculum of 33 Nairobi schools, facilitates the continued efforts for adding animal welfare to the country’s national curriculum, works with the judiciary and countless others to remove trapping wire while advocating for ending bushmeat consumption.

It has been said that in life we need three things.  “Someone to love, something to do, and something to look forward to”.  ANAW, for many of us, has become part of our lives, with the mission, and the people on both sides of the Atlantic striving to make the world a better place for all living creatures.

I wish to take this opportunity to say thank you to the Board of Directors and staff in Denver that makes the transmission of funds to Nairobi possible.  From left to right, Philip Tedeschi, Bob Uttaro, David Gies, Richard Reading, Janet Rumfelt, Kristen Nelson, Professor James Nakansa (ANAW in Nairobi), Richard Male, Maria Galter, and Jos Ngonyo.  Not pictured are Arielle Giddens, Nehemiah Rotich and Keith Gehring.

anaw-50-pano

If you are interested in more of the particulars please visit the ANAW websites, http://www.anaw.org and http://www.anaw-usa.org.

ANAW is not eligible to be reviewed by Charity Navigators because our assets are less than $1,000,000.  Until we can reach this threshold, and in the interest of staking our reputation as a reputable and worthy nonprofit organization, our 2015 Audit is available upon request, for anyone wishing to learn more about us.  Also, our 990 tax returns can be accessed at www.guidestar.org.

Best wishes for this holiday season.

David Gies,

ANAW-USA Board President

cgday-log

Same Manure, Different Flies

More of the same?  The “will” to balance growth while protecting flora and fauna rests with democratic structures and mediating structures.  Everything is a delicate balance between self-interest and social justice, or so it seems to me.  Oligarchies and powerful people rule unless others, the people who have less power, organize for the common good. Who speaks for the animals in Nairobi National Park?  Who complains about executive excess?

Governments have to act, to prioritize habitat and conservation.  Elephants have taken a real beating.

The newest threat in Kenya is a planned railway intended to cut through the middle of Nairobi National Park, the only park in the world that shares a boundary with an urban center, a center as large as the biggest city in East Africa.  Political leadership will announce the intent to proceed with the railway across the Park’s boundary, which would literally cut it in two.  The announcement is set for September 26, 2016.  If the a railway is constructed on the proposed site it will

p1160884
Red Line is proposed railway bisecting Nairobi National Park

change Nairobi National Park forever. Opposition to the proposed railway is growing.

Land grabs and money deals continue, but observers in the United States ought to be careful not to throw stones.  There are examples of unfettered self-interest in the U.S. too.  We learn that Bill Clinton as honorary chancellor of Laureate International Universities earned $17.6 million over a period of five years until 2015 (Washington Post Sept 5, 2016, by Rosalind S. Helderman and Michelle Ye Hee Lee, in the Politics section). These earnings seem a tad bit excessive, even for a private school.  The West is critical of excessive use of power and influence yet there are examples of excesses everywhere.

For a country like Kenya, where raw earth materials and transportation to the coast is a priority, special protections for places like Nairobi National Park are cast aside.  Kenya’s new constitutional processes established six years ago are ignored.  A broader solution building the railway around the Park would save habitat and the animals living in the Park promoting future tourism.  It isn’t a done deal yet.  Let’s hope there is a change of heart and Nairobi National Park will be saved for future generations of animals and people.  Here is speaking for the animals first and for the people second.