Hard Truths for Africa

Saturday’s Denver Post Editorial about Obama speaking hard truth in Africa is right on the mark in my view.  President Obama’s visit was the occasion for an American President to speak openly about Africa’s own responsibility for creating a better life for Africans.  He came with no package of U.S. aid or promises that haveP1040492 not already been made.  Because of his legacy he speaks like no other U.S. President could.  It is remarkable that as a guest he was so calm and authentic in addressing corruption, politicians who are reluctant to leave office, and the cost of cronyism to middle-class Kenyans.  Kenya loses 250,000 jobs to corruption annually. He spoke about the importance for encouraging entrepreneurialism, education, especially for girls and the importance for creating a strong civil society.   Frankly, as I read the Daily Nation newspaper when living and working in Kenya, I think President Uhuru Kenyatta is working diligently to clean-up his cabinet putting six of the highest ranking people on administrate leave until investigations for graft are completed. This is a first for a Kenyan President.  Times are changing.

So we have Obama talking seriously about Africa’s responsibilities and when not referring to corruption he emphasizes the huge economic growth currently taking place across the continent.  He says we need to, the West needs to, re-evaluate its perceptions about Africa.

Indeed people like Minnesotan Walter Palmer, who killed Cecil the lion in such a despicable manner, is a sharp contrast to the likes of a caring son of Kenyan blood who happens to be our President.  Compare him to the narcissistic criminal act of one very self-deluted hunter and one can wonder just who are we really?  The irony of the this week’s news.

2 thoughts on “Hard Truths for Africa

  1. Aubrey Lavizzo says:

    Thank you for your observations about President Uhuru Kenyatta’s seeming reversal from cronyism and corruption. It had been my concern that collaborative efforts to create altruistic educational and public health programs for Kenya’s people and animals may ultimately only have served to foster corruption. Your observations are reassuring. Thank you.

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